Men

Men

Men and women share many health concerns in common, but there are of course many differences between the sexes, through their biological composition, the traditional roles and responsibilities that society continues to perpetuate, and their statuses within the family and community.

There are many health impacts that are specifically pronounced for men. For example, recent evidence from the WHO European Region shows that men are three times more likely to be victims of homicide, with males aged 30–59 years seen as most at risk.

Male suicides in Wales were recently shown to have risen by 23 per cent between 2012 and 2013, and across the United Kingdom, male suicides in 2013 were at their highest rate since 2001. The highest UK suicide rate in 2013 age group was among men aged 45 to 59, at 25.1 deaths per 100,000, the highest for that age group since 1981.

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men in the UK.

The highest UK suicide rate in 2013 by broad age group was among men aged 45 to 59, at 25.1 deaths per 100,000, the highest for that age group since 1981.
Office for National Statistics

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